Twitch Analytics Overview

Twitch has recently added a new Analytics page, presenting information that is more clear, specific, and plentiful. This change provides some extremely useful metrics for streamers to look at and see areas for improvement.

Today I’ll be going over all the different sections and giving you the scoop on what they mean and how you can use the information to make the most out of your stream.

To reach the new analytics page, go to your Dashboard and go to “Channel” on the left side of the screen under the “Analytics” header.

The Graph

Twitch Analytics

Date Range Bar

The top bar containing the date will let you adjust the range of your data. By default it’s on the month you’re currently on. You can click the middle portion allowing you to adjust the date range from the last 7 days, 30 days, or previous 2 months. It also opens up a calendar to create your own custom date range.

IMPORTANT: The date range selected will modify ALL information being shown on the analytics page so make sure to properly select the dates you desire before looking at the other sections.

Graph

Twitch Analytics

The graph contains tons of helpful data and not just the information you see when you first open the page!

By default, at the top of the graph it shows you Average Viewers, Live Views, New Followers, Subscriptions, and Total Revenue for whatever date range you currently have selected.

Clicking on any of them allows you to graph that specific metric. Also, clicking the up and down arrows on the right side of each metric lets you swap it for one currently not displayed.

The graph itself allows you to filter the image per day, week, and month. Hovering over any of the bars gives you a breakdown of the currently selected metric for that particular stream(s).

Revenue Breakdown

Twitch RevenueThis section breaks down all your revenue made on your channel. Additionally, it will show how much you made in your last period. You can have a quick breakdown of subs by hovering over the “Paid Subs” section. It will then show you how many subs exist at each tier and how much total revenue you received for those tiers.

Subscribers Breakdown

Twitch Subscribers Stats

This section breaks down all the different tiers of subscribers, showing your revenue split for each. It also displays your total sub points and subscribers.

You have the ability to have your whole subscriber list emailed to you as well as a one-click method to send an e-mail to all your subscribers. This is a great way to thank your subs or send out newsletters all in one go!

Top Streams/Clips

Twitch Top StreamsThis section lists off your top 5 streams for your currently selected date range. You can filter this by clicking the drop-down menu in the top right. The other options are New Followers and New Subscribers.

Twitch Top ClipsJust like top streams, this section covers your Top 5 clips for that date range.

Views by Location

Twitch views by locationThis breaks down all the different ways your stream has been viewed. This can include direct views, hosts, and even from places your stream might have been embedded. Hovering over each bar will give you a specific number of views from that source.

Clicking the “View Details” button opens it up for even more information!

Twitch viewer dataHow to Use Your Twitch Analytics

Analytics can be overwhelming and especially for smaller/new content creators it can even be a bit disheartening at the start. Don’t mull over them too much and don’t get hooked on the numbers. Entering the analytics page should be from an objective viewpoint.

Create Goals

The first thing before even diving into the numbers is figuring out exactly what you’re trying to accomplish.

If you’re feeling things have been a bit stale or maybe a slight drop in a certain area of the stream, then maybe it’s time to figure out what can be changed. Analytics aren’t meant to make you sad. They’re tools to help you grow and improve.

Start Broad then Specific

The date range you start with will dictate the types of information you see later on in the page so you’ll want to choose something broad. It doesn’t have to be from the whole past year but due to how Twitch fluctuates from day to day, it’s usually not worth it to look at it short term.

Looking at the big picture first allows you to pinpoint specific parts of the graph. From there you can zoom in on those sections and figure out irregularities (both good and bad). See a jump in viewership or followers? Or maybe a couple of streams during the week were on the low side. This is where saving your VoDs is useful as it allows you to go back and see what exactly you were doing during those particular streams.

Views by Location

These stats can help you get a better idea of your community and where your support is coming from. This is especially useful for streamers who are new and looking to solidify their schedule. You’ll get a better idea of what your peak times are for different areas around the world.

You can also get a better idea of other channels that may be supporting you through hosts. This can be a good way to figure out potential people to network with and to build some awesome Twitch relationships!

Top Streams/Clips

Looking back at your top streams is a quick and easy way to figure out your high points in the past days, weeks, months. It’s just as important to look at what you’ve been doing right. It’ll help build up confidence and also give you a better idea of what’s worked best for you. You don’t have to replicate exactly what went on stream that day but it’s good to know why it was a better day than most.

Top Clips are perfect for showcasing your best moments. Make sure to share these with your community through your social media. They are a quick window into your channel and what it’s all about so sharing them can help let others know why your channel is the place to be on Twitch! Additionally, downloading them is a perfect way to compile a nice montage for your YouTube channel.

Twitch Fluctuates

Twitch is an ever-changing platform and what works some days may not work others. Don’t feel disheartened if you see a dip in viewership. Every streamer goes up and down. Ride those highs as long as you can and don’t get hooked on those occasional dips. Unless you’ve been on a downward trend for a long time or you’ve seen no growth in months; analytics shouldn’t be the first thing you go for. Sometimes you just need to find what makes you happy on Twitch and chase that.